Tuesday, December 28, 2010

More Recipes for Winter Co-op Veggies

The following recipe was sent to us by 2 long time co-op members. Thanks Julia & Bruce.
Recipe courtesy of The Epicurious.com
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/236414

Roasted Kohlrabi and Butternut Squash
4 medium kohlrabi (2 1/4 lb with greens or 1 3/4 lb without)
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh thyme
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 1/2 lb butternut squash
Special equipment: a 17- by 12- by 1-inch shallow heavy baking pan

Put oven rack just below middle position and put baking pan on rack, then preheat oven to 450°F. (If roasting vegetables along with turkey, preheat pan for 15 minutes while turkey roasts, then roast vegetables underneath turkey.)

Trim and peel kohlrabi, then cut into 3/4-inch pieces. Toss kohlrabi with 1 tablespoon oil, 1 teaspoon thyme, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 3/4 teaspoon pepper in a bowl. Transfer kohlrabi to preheated pan in oven and roast 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, peel butternut squash, then quarter lengthwise, seed, and cut into 3/4-inch pieces. Toss squash with remaining 1 tablespoon oil, 1 teaspoon thyme, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 3/4 teaspoon pepper in same bowl.

Stir kohlrabi, turning it, then push it to one side of pan.

Add squash to opposite side of pan and roast, stirring and turning squash over halfway through roasting, until vegetables are tender and lightly browned, about 30 minutes total (after squash is added).

Toss vegetables to combine and transfer to a dish.


Cooks' note:
Kohlrabi and butternut squash can be cut 1 day ahead and chilled in separate sealed plastic bags.

Recipes for Winter Co-op Veggies

Last year, we were fortunate enough to have the fabulous Hanne Blank, offer a cooking seminar. The seminar was centered on what to do with the winter co-op veggies. The following 4 recipes are courtesy of Hanne. Need more ideas?
http://www.hanneblank.com/blog/

Moroccan Orange Salad
Bright and zesty, this version of a traditional north African salad is great when more traditional salad ingredients are out of season.
Serves 4-5.

6 medium oranges, peeled
1/3 cup chopped black Greek olives
1/3 cup (packed) Italian parsley, coarsely chopped
1/4 cup finely chopped red onion

1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon crushed Aleppo pepper (optional)

Slice oranges crosswise into rounds, remove seeds if needed, and quarter each round. Combine oranges, olives, parsley, and onion in a large bowl.

Whisk together lemon juice, olive oil, sugar, and spices. Combine dressing with the oranges and vegetables. Let stand at room temperature at least 1 hour, or refrigerate for longer. If
refrigerated, return to room temperature before serving.


Roast Baby Beets and Turnips with Mint-Garlic Yogurt
Roasted root vegetables served with yogurt are a comfort food throughout the Fertile Crescent. You can add or substitute other root vegetables, too. Serves 4-6.

1 1/2 pounds baby beets (or quartered large beets)
1 1/2 pounds baby turnips
2 T olive oil

3/4 cup yogurt
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon dried mint, crushed fine
1 clove garlic

Preheat oven to 425 F.

Mash garlic clove into a smooth paste with salt using the side of a knife or in a mortar. Stir garlic paste and mint into yogurt and set aside.

Clean and trim beets and turnips. If skins are thick or too tough to pierce easily with your fingernail, peel them.

Toss beets and turnips with olive oil and place in baking dish. Roast at 425 F until easily pierced with a sharp knife, 20-30 minutes, then remove from oven. Allow beets to cool for at least 10 minutes before serving so that yogurt will not separate due to heat. Serve vegetables onto plates, spooning yogurt sauce over the top.

Notes:
• Larger turnips may have a bitter edge when roasted. If you cannot locate small turnips, simply use more beets, or try carrots.
• If you wish to keep the turnips pale, toss them alone in ½ of the olive oil, and roast them in their own baking dish separate from the beets.
• If using soy yogurt, be aware that almost all brands of plain soy yogurt sold in the US are sweetened. If you cannot obtain unsweetened soy yogurt, you will need to correct for the sweetness by adding fresh lemon juice to the yogurt, 1 teaspoon at a time, until it tastes right
to you.


Mushroom-Celeriac Pecan Pate
This versatile, light, and savory vegan pate works with bread, crackers, or crudités, and makes a great sandwich filling. It is also delicious thinned with some of the pasta cooking water and tossed with hot pasta as a pesto. This recipe makes enough for several meals.

3/4 pound button or crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
1 large yellow onion, chopped
1 medium bulb celeriac, trimmed and grated on the large holes of a box grater
8 cloves garlic, chopped
4 Tablespoons olive oil
3 Tablespoons tamari or soy sauce
1 teaspoon dried sage, crushed
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed
1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram, crushed
3/4 cup red wine (or substitute mushroom broth)
2 ½ to 3 cups shelled pecans
salt and black pepper to taste

Heat olive oil in large heavy pan. Saute onions until transparent, add mushrooms and garlic and saute until mushrooms are soft. Add celeriac, tamari, and herbs and cook uncovered until celeriac softens. Add wine (or broth) and simmer uncovered until level of liquid is reduced by a
little more than half.

Working in three or four batches so as not to overload the food processor, puree sauteed ingredients with pecans in food processor. Place pureed pate in a mixing bowl as each batch is finished. When everything has been pureed, mix everything together to ensure evenness. Taste and correct seasonings.

Pack pate into serving bowl, cover with plastic wrap or waxed paper, pressing wrap onto surface of pate, and chill at least overnight. Let come to room temperature before serving.


Braised Red Cabbage with Apple and Mustard
A twist on a traditional Mennonite method of cooking the old faithfuls of winter produce. This holds well, so make enough for lunch the next day.

For each person:
2 cups red cabbage, cored and sliced into ribbons about 1/3 inch wide
½ small yellow onion, thinly sliced
1 tart apple, quartered, cored, and sliced ¼ inch thick
2 teaspoons olive or grapeseed oil
1/3 cup apple cider
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 heaping tablespoon wholegrain prepared mustard
Salt and Pepper to taste

Heat oil in a heavy sauté pan. When oil is very hot, add onion and sauté until translucent. Add cabbage and toss to coat cabbage with hot oil. Add vinegar and apple cider, reduce heat to moderate, cover loosely and braise 7-10 minutes (or more, depending on quantity being
cooked), stirring once or twice. Cabbage should be limp but not yet completely soft.

Remove lid and increase heat to reduce liquid. When liquid has reduced somewhat (by about 1/3), add apple and toss gently with cabbage and onion. When liquid is 2/3 reduced, push solids to the sides of the pan to make a clearing in the center, and stir mustard in to the liquid in the middle. Toss liquid and solids together, taste, and correct seasonings if needed.

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

It's Time to Talk Turkey!

Thanksgiving Turkey & Ham Orders
last day to place order
Sunday, November 14th. 3:00pm
Deposit is required at time of order

Our hams are from locally sourced pigs from Whispering Pines Farm, Frederick County, MD.
Pork is processed & cured by Wagner Brothers in Mount Airy, MD.
Our turkeys are locally sourced from Maple Lawn Turkey Farm, Howard County, MD.
Pigs & turkeys are humanely raised & processed - no growth hormones, nor anti-biotics.
more info on turkeys www.maplelawn.com


Wagner Whole Hams - (average weight 20-22 lbs). $3.09/lb.
$40.00 deposit

Wagner Butt Portion Ham - (average weight 10 lbs.) $3.19/lb.
$20.00 deposit

Maple Lawn Turkeys - $2.39/lb.
Order turkeys by weight range
10-12 lb. - $20.00 deposit
14 - 16 lb - $25.00 deposit
18 - 20 lb. - $30.00 deposit
22-24 lb. - $40.00 deposit
26 - 28 lb. - $50.00 deposit
30 - 32 lb. - $60.00 deposit

Thursday, August 12, 2010

Great Recipes for the Summer's Bounty

Thanks to Jen (ZensationsbyJen) & Carrie (co-op member) for these great recipes.

Watermelon Gazpacho
8 cups coarsely chopped watermelon
1 large red tomato, diced
1/2 cucumber, peeled & diced
1/2 small purple onion, peeled & diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 Tbs. cilantro, finely chopped
1/2 cup EVOO
1/3 cup tomato juice
1/3 cup water
1/4 cup sherry vinegar
2 Tbs. lime juice
1/2 tsp. cayenne
salt to taste
Wonderfully refreshing!
*********************************************************************************
Chocolate Zucchini Cake Thanks to Carrie for sharing her favorite recipe. Carrie's tip - add an extra cup of chocolate chips!

Chocolate Zucchini Cake

2 medium zucchini, trimmed and grated on large holes of box grater
9 tbsp. butter, at room temperature
2 3/4 cups flour
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa
1 1/4 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. salt
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup corn oil
2 eggs
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1/2 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup confectioners' sugar

1. Working in batches, put a small mound of zucchini in center of large square of double-layer cheesecloth. Gather corners together and squeeze out as much water as possible. Transfer zucchini to a bowl and set aside.

2. Preheat oven to 325º. Butter a deep 9" cake pan with 1 tbsp. of the butter. Sift flour, cocoa, baking soda, and salt together into a mixing bowl and set aside. Beat together remaining 8 tbsp. butter and sugar in a large bowl with an electric mixer on medium speed until fluffy, 3-4 minutes.

3. Add oil, beating well. Beat in one egg at a time, add vanilla, reduce speed to low, and beat in flour mixture and buttermilk in 3 alternate batches. Stir in reserved zucchini.

4. Pour batter into prepared pan and bake until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean, about 1 hour and 20 minutes. Remove from oven and set aside to let cool. Invert onto a plate and dust with sugar.

This article was first published in Saveur in Issue #52

************************************************************************************
Originally published in The Post years ago, tweaked by Carrie over the years.

Salsa Cruda
Makes 1 quart
4 medium tomatoes
6 large tomatillo
1/2 bunch scallions
Juice of 1 lime
1/2 bunch cilantro
2 Anaheim or Cubanel peppers
1 small jalapeno pepper
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp sugar

Blend in a food processor and serve. Can be refrigerated for up to 5 days.

************************************************************************************
Peaches work well, too

Upside-down cake is the dessert world's equivalent to everyone's favorite breakfast treat: sticky buns. Just as sticky buns bake in a pool of sugar, butter and raisins, then are flipped over so all that lovely sticky sweetness is on top, so does the appropriately named upside-down cake. Butter, sugar and fruit are arranged in a pan, the cake batter poured over it, and after baking the cake is turned upside down, revealing a moist, sweet fruit topping.

Pineapple upside-down cake is a long-time favorite in this genre, but other fruits serve equally well in place of pineapple. Try cherries and almonds, apples, or pears. Here unpeeled nectarines lend a real summery taste to this year-round treat.

Topping
1/4 cup (1/2 stick, 2 ounces) unsalted butter
1/2 cup (3 1/4 ounces) light brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 large (12 to 14 ounces) ripe nectarines
2 teaspoons (1 ounce) lemon juice

Cake
1 1/3 cups (5 1/2 ounces) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
3/4 cup (5 1/4 ounces) sugar
1 3/4 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons (1 1/2 ounces) butter
1/2 cup milk
1 teaspoon vanilla or almond extract
1 large egg

Topping: Melt the butter, and mix with brown sugar, nutmeg and cinnamon. Spoon the mixture into an ungreased 8 x 8-inch square baking pan. Preheat the oven to 375°F.

Cake: Slice the nectarines 1/4-inch thick. Lay the slices into prepared pan, and sprinkle with lemon juice. Set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter and sugar, then beat in the milk, egg, and vanilla or almond extract. Stir in the flour, baking powder and salt. Gently pour the batter over the fruit in the pan.

Bake the cake for 45 minutes, or until the cake begins to pull away from sides of pan, and springs back to the touch. Remove from the oven, and cool for 5 minutes in the pan. Invert the pan onto a serving platter, and let it sit 1 minute more before removing pan. If any fruit sticks to the pan, use a spatula to carefully scrape it off and replace it on the cake. Serve warm, with whipped cream or ice cream, if desired.

This recipe reprinted from The Baking Sheet Newsletter, Vol. II, No. 8, August 1991 issue.




Back by popular demand!

In addition to the Vegetarian Share (4 produce items) & the Omnivore (4 produce items/1 meat/1dairy) we have brought back
The Carnivore
4 produce - 1 meat - 1 dairy item/week
$228.00 for 13 weeks of locally sourced food
Last Day to sign up
August 22nd.
for more info see the post below

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

Kale & Chickpea Soup

Thank you Sarah for this wonderful recipe, incorporating kale from the CSA, Chorizo & chickpeas (& other items marked **) from Mill Valley

Kale and Chickpea Soup
1 medium onion, chopped (1 cup)**
2 garlic cloves, chopped
1 Turkish or 1/2 California bay leaf
1 teaspoon salt**
1/8 teaspoon black pepper**
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil**
1 large boiling potato(3/4 lb), peeled and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
3/4 lb kale, stems and center ribs cut out and discarded, then leaves very finely chopped in a food processor (4 cups)**
3 1/2 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth (28 fl oz)
2 cups water
1 (14-oz) can chickpeas, rinsed and drained**
1/4 lb Spanish chorizo (cured spiced pork sausage), casing discarded and sausage cut into 1/4-inch dice (1 cup)**

Cook onion, garlic, bay leaf, salt, and pepper in oil in a wide 4- to 6-quart heavy pot over moderate heat, stirring frequently, until onion and garlic are softened and beginning to brown, 5 to 7 minutes. Add potato, kale, broth, and water and cook, partially covered, until potatoes are tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Reduce heat to low, then add chickpeas and chorizo and gently simmer, uncovered, 3 minutes. Discard bay leaf and season with salt and pepper.

Enjoy!

Gourmet
November 2004
2004-10-21 16:22:57.0

Wednesday, June 9, 2010

What to do with Bok Choy

Bok choy is healthy and tasty. It can be a terrific substitute or addition to peppers, onions and other vegetables in your favorite recipes.
Bok choy

About bok choy

Bok choy, oftentimes called Chinese cabbage, is largely associated with Chinese cooking. And while its name suggests classification as a cabbage, it bears little resemblance to the western cabbage we in America have come to know so well. The plant has dark green, crisp leaves and crunchy white stems as well as a mildly spicy flavor that hints at the relationship to mustard.

Bok choy has been around in Western culture for hundreds of years and yet it hasn’t really been widely embraced into other types of cuisine. You won't find bok choy in an Italian, Greek or Mexican dish. However in the Philippines, it is probable to have bok choy replacing cabbage in a lot of popular recipes, namely in the Pancit and the Kimchi.

Most people are not aware that there are twenty different varieties of bok choy in the Asian market, every one with a different size and flavor. While Westerners tend to value size when it comes to Chinese vegetables, in China the opposite is true. The smaller, the more tender it is.

Bok Choy Sum, also known as Chinese flowering cabbage, is easy to tell apart from the rest due to its light green leaves and tiny yellow flowers. Bok Choy Sum is usually sold with trimmed leaves and in stalks, sort of like celery hearts.

Cooking bok choy

Bok choy is liked due to its light sweet flavor, crisp texture and good nutritional value. It is high in Vitamin A, C and calcium while being very low in calories.

You will find bok choy is quite adaptable in the sense that it can be boiled, stir-fried and steamed. When cooking bok choy, separate the leaves from the stalk as the stalk takes longer to cook.

Bok choy

Bok choy and chicken stir fry

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 Tbsp sesame oil
  • 16 oz boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • 4 heads baby bok choy
  • 1 large clove garlic (grated with juice)
  • 2 Tbsp sesame seeds
  • 2 Tbsp soy sauce

Directions

  1. Cut chicken into 1/2-inch wide strips.
  2. Clean and trim bok choy.
  3. Heat oil in large non-stick skillet or wok over medium heat until oil shimmers.
  4. Add strips of chicken and stir-fry for 5-6 minutes.
  5. Add remaining ingredients and continue stir-frying for another 5 minutes or until bok choy begins to wilt.
  6. Serve immediately with rice.

Chicken recipes

What to do with Napa Cabbage

Looking for a healthy crunch? Need something to wrap, wok or roll? Have you tried napa cabbage? Napa cabbage is an Asian vegetable that resembles regular green cabbage, but is longer and oval-shaped. Napa cabbage has slightly more protein and fewer calories than regular cabbage and a unique taste like a mild celery or bok choy. Here are eight things you can do with this very versatile veggie.

Kimchi

8 Things to do with napa cabbage

1. Napa Cabbage Rolls

Instead of using green cabbage, try some of the larger outer leaves of napa cabbage. Cut them in half and steam or boil them until they just turn soft and then fill with a mixture of cooked white rice and browned mild sausage or hamburger. Top with tomato sauce and bake until bubbly.

2. Quick Kimchi

Kimchi is a spicy Korean side-dish, sort of like the hottest cole slaw you’ve ever eaten. Traditional kimchi can take several days to make. However, for a quick at-home version, combine a few cups of chopped napa cabbage, a tablespoon of sambal olek (an Eastern hot sauce), 3 tablespoons of rice wine vinegar, 4 sliced cloves of garlic, and a healthy pinch of salt. Stir well, chill overnight and then eat right out of the bowl!

3. Napa Cabbage Stir-Fry

If you have eaten a Chinese dish with vegetables, you have probably eaten napa cabbage. Typically, they are white squares that look like they should be onions, but have not turned clear. To do your own napa cabbage stir-fry, peel off 20 to 25 leaves and cut off the leafy green sections until all you have is the firmer white stems. Cut the white stems into two-inch pieces. Heat some peanut oil in a wok, cook the napa cabbage for 3 to 4 minutes until it starts to soften, and then add your favorite stir-fry sauce. Cook until the sauce starts to bubble. Serve hot over rice.

4. Napa Cabbage Slaw

Got a favorite cole slaw recipe? Try it with shredded napa cabbage. Napa cabbage slaw has a subtly different flavor and texture than classic cole slaw and is particularly tasty if you add fruit. For your next slaw, combine 2 cups diced mango, a finely diced jalapeno, 1 cup mayonnaise, 2 cups shredded napa cabbage, and 4 tablespoons rice or red wine vinegar. Refrigerate for a couple of hours or overnight and serve.

5. Braised Napa Cabbage

For a quick and easy side-dish, add the cut up white stems of the napa cabbage to a skillet and cover them half way with vegetable broth, ground ginger, garlic powder, and a few teaspoons of soy sauce. Cook over medium heat for 8 to 10 minutes or until the napa cabbage becomes soft.

6. Napa Cabbage Spring Rolls

Napa cabbage has a great crunch that’s perfect for spring rolls. Simply slice napa cabbage into thin strips and roll with cooked shrimp, rice noodles, and fresh basil in a spring roll wrapper. Serve with a dipping sauce of soy sauce, chilies and fish sauce.

7. Napa Cabbage Taco Topping

Traditionally, tacos are topped with a healthy handful of lettuce. A better choice is napa cabbage, which is more flavorful and totes a crisper texture, which contrasts nicely with the taco fillings.

8. Napa Cabbage Soup

Warm up with a hearty bowl of napa cabbage soup. Add a few cups of chopped napa cabbage to your favorite vegetable, chicken or beef soup; it will give your soup a lot of body and for fewer calories than most other ingredients.

Napa cabbage recipes

Sunday, May 30, 2010

Strawberry-Rhubarb Pie Recipe

2 - 10" pie crusts
4 cups strawberries
4 stalks rhubarb (approx. 1 lb.)
1 1/2 cups sugar
3 tablespoons tapioca flour or 2 tablespoons quick cooking tapioca
2 tablespoons flour
1 egg yolk, beaten1teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Line 10" pie plate with 1 crust. Place in refrigerator along with 2nd. crust.

2.Rinse, hull & slice strawberries into a large bowl. Cut rhubarb into 1" thick slices, add to strawberries. Add sugar, tapioca, flour, egg yolk, vanilla, cinnamon & nutmeg to the fruit & toss until blended. Spoon mixture into pie plate.

3. Cover pie with second crust, crimp & seal edges. Make slits in top crust to allow steam to escape. Bake at 400 degrees for 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 375 degrees & bake for an additional 40 minutes. If necessary collar the pie with foil to keep edges from getting too brown.

4. Cool & Enjoy!!
This recipe & 149 more available in "Dishing Up Maryland" by Lucie L. Snodgrass, now available at the shop. Great cookbook to encourage you to shop locally & cook seasonally.

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Cool Season Herbs & Veggies Are In

Locally Grown * Certified Organic
Help From Above Farm
has supplied us with

Market Packs - $4.00 each - 6 plants per pack
Arugula * Broccoli * Brussel Sprouts * Red Lollo Lettuce
Hull Peas * Sugar Snap Peas * Spinach * Cilantro
Tangy Mesclun Mix * Mixed Leaf Lettuce * Lacinato Kale
Red Beets * Red Chard * Collard Greens
Cabbage & Cauliflower

3" Pots - priced per variety - $2.50 - $4.00
Yellow Potatoes * Sweet Basil * Thai Basil * Dill * Fennel
Italian Flat Leaf Parsley * Sage * Thyme * Rosemary
Oregano * Lavender * Peppermint & Spearmint

Sunday, March 14, 2010

Celeriac Salad

Ingredients

celeriac.jpg

  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 2 Tbsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 2 Tbsp chopped parsley
  • 1 lb celery root - quartered, peeled, and coarsely grated just before mixing
  • 1/2 tart green apple, peeled, cored, julienned
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper

Method

Combine the mayonnaise, mustard, lemon juice and parsley in a medium-sized bowl. Fold in the celery root and apple and season with salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, at least 1 hour.

Beet Hummus Recipe - Great for the 4th.

Thank you Celeste - member of our Buyer's Co-op for the following recipe.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 pound beets (about 4 medium sized beets), scrubbed clean, cooked, peeled, and cubed*
  • 2 Tbsp tahini sesame seed paste
  • 5 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 small clove garlic, chopped
  • 1 Tbsp ground cumin
  • 1 Tbsp lemon zest (zest from approx. 2 lemons)
  • Generous pinch of sea salt or Kosher salt
  • Fresh ground pepper to taste

*To cook the beets, cut off any tops, scrub the roots clean, put them in a covered dish with about 1/4-inch of water in a 375°F oven, and cook until easily penetrated with a knife or fork. Alternatively, cover with water in a saucepan and simmer until tender, about 1/2 hour. Peel once they have cooled.

Method

Place all ingredients in a food processor (or blender) and pulse until smooth. Taste and adjust seasonings and ingredients as desired.

Chill and store in the refrigerator for up to 3 days or freeze for longer storage.

Eat with pita chips, or with sliced cucumber or celery, or on a crostini with goat cheese and shaved mint.

Makes 2 cups.

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

It's Rutabaga Week at Mill Valley!

What is a rutabaga? The rutabaga is a root vegetable resulting from the cross between a cabbage and a turnip. Sweeter than a turnip. A great winter comfort food. Can be used in any root vegetable recipe or try the recipes below.
Rutabaga Casserole with Apples
Cook Time: 30 minutes
3 cups peeled, sliced rutabaga
2 med. apples, sliced
1/2 cup brown sugar, packed
3 tbsp. butter
Salt
Preparation
Cook rutabaga slices in boiling, salted water until just tender; drain. Place 1/2 of slices of rutabaga and 1/2 of apple slices in greased, 1 quart casserole. Sprinkle with 1/2 of brown sugar; dot with 1/2 of butter. Sprinkle with salt. Repeat layers. Bake, covered at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.

Rutabaga and Chopped Onions
Ingredients
1 rutabaga, diced ( 4-6 cups)
1 chopped onion
2 tablespoons butter
salt and pepper to taste.
Preparation
Cook rutabaga and onion in a small amount of boiling, salted water until tender. Drain and mash; add butter, salt and pepper. Mash again. Serves 4-6.

Rutabaga in Cheese Sauce
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Ingredients
1/4 cup melted butter
1/4 cup flour
2 cups milk
1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
salt and pepper
1 large rutabaga, diced and cooked (4-5 cups diced) Cook diced in boiling salted water until just tender; drain
1/2 cup soft bread crumbs tossed with 1 tbsp. butter
Preparation
Melt butter in a saucepan over low heat; stir in flour. Continue to cook and stir until smooth; gradually stir in milk. Cook, stirring constantly, until thickened. Add cheese and stir until melted and sauce is smooth. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Place rutabaga in a shallow, lightly buttered baking dish; pour sauce over rutabaga. Sprinkle with buttered bread crumbs. Bake at 400 degrees for 15 -20 minutes. Serves 6.

Enjoy!

Saturday, February 20, 2010

Recipes from Saturday's Food Demo

Recipes courtesy of Hanne Blank. If you did not attend the demo & sampling, you missed out on some scrumptious dishes. Recipes below.

Moroccan Orange Salad
Bright and zesty, this version of a traditional north African salad is great when more traditional salad ingredients are out of season.
Serves 4-5.

6 medium oranges, peeled
1/3 cup chopped black Greek olives
1/3 cup (packed) Italian parsley, coarsely chopped
1/4 cup finely chopped red onion

1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon crushed Aleppo pepper (optional)

Slice oranges crosswise into rounds, remove seeds if needed, and quarter each round. Combine oranges, olives, parsley, and onion in a large bowl.

Whisk together lemon juice, olive oil, sugar, and spices. Combine dressing with the oranges and vegetables. Let stand at room temperature at least 1 hour, or refrigerate for longer. If
refrigerated, return to room temperature before serving.


Roast Baby Beets and Turnips with Mint-Garlic Yogurt
Roasted root vegetables served with yogurt are a comfort food throughout the Fertile Crescent. You can add or substitute other root vegetables, too. Serves 4-6.

1 1/2 pounds baby beets (or quartered large beets)
1 1/2 pounds baby turnips
2 T olive oil

3/4 cup yogurt
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon dried mint, crushed fine
1 clove garlic

Preheat oven to 425 F.

Mash garlic clove into a smooth paste with salt using the side of a knife or in a mortar. Stir garlic paste and mint into yogurt and set aside.

Clean and trim beets and turnips. If skins are thick or too tough to pierce easily with your fingernail, peel them.

Toss beets and turnips with olive oil and place in baking dish. Roast at 425 F until easily pierced with a sharp knife, 20-30 minutes, then remove from oven. Allow beets to cool for at least 10 minutes before serving so that yogurt will not separate due to heat. Serve vegetables onto plates, spooning yogurt sauce over the top.

Notes:
• Larger turnips may have a bitter edge when roasted. If you cannot locate small turnips, simply use more beets, or try carrots.
• If you wish to keep the turnips pale, toss them alone in ½ of the olive oil, and roast them in their own baking dish separate from the beets.
• If using soy yogurt, be aware that almost all brands of plain soy yogurt sold in the US are sweetened. If you cannot obtain unsweetened soy yogurt, you will need to correct for the sweetness by adding fresh lemon juice to the yogurt, 1 teaspoon at a time, until it tastes right
to you.


Mushroom-Celeriac Pecan Pate
This versatile, light, and savory vegan pate works with bread, crackers, or crudités, and makes a great sandwich filling. It is also delicious thinned with some of the pasta cooking water and tossed with hot pasta as a pesto. This recipe makes enough for several meals.

3/4 pound button or crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
1 large yellow onion, chopped
1 medium bulb celeriac, trimmed and grated on the large holes of a box grater
8 cloves garlic, chopped
4 Tablespoons olive oil
3 Tablespoons tamari or soy sauce
1 teaspoon dried sage, crushed
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed
1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram, crushed
3/4 cup red wine (or substitute mushroom broth)
2 ½ to 3 cups shelled pecans
salt and black pepper to taste

Heat olive oil in large heavy pan. Saute onions until transparent, add mushrooms and garlic and saute until mushrooms are soft. Add celeriac, tamari, and herbs and cook uncovered until celeriac softens. Add wine (or broth) and simmer uncovered until level of liquid is reduced by a
little more than half.

Working in three or four batches so as not to overload the food processor, puree sauteed ingredients with pecans in food processor. Place pureed pate in a mixing bowl as each batch is finished. When everything has been pureed, mix everything together to ensure evenness. Taste and correct seasonings.

Pack pate into serving bowl, cover with plastic wrap or waxed paper, pressing wrap onto surface of pate, and chill at least overnight. Let come to room temperature before serving.


Braised Red Cabbage with Apple and Mustard
A twist on a traditional Mennonite method of cooking the old faithfuls of winter produce. This holds well, so make enough for lunch the next day.

For each person:
2 cups red cabbage, cored and sliced into ribbons about 1/3 inch wide
½ small yellow onion, thinly sliced
1 tart apple, quartered, cored, and sliced ¼ inch thick
2 teaspoons olive or grapeseed oil
1/3 cup apple cider
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 heaping tablespoon wholegrain prepared mustard
Salt and Pepper to taste

Heat oil in a heavy sauté pan. When oil is very hot, add onion and sauté until translucent. Add cabbage and toss to coat cabbage with hot oil. Add vinegar and apple cider, reduce heat to moderate, cover loosely and braise 7-10 minutes (or more, depending on quantity being
cooked), stirring once or twice. Cabbage should be limp but not yet completely soft.

Remove lid and increase heat to reduce liquid. When liquid has reduced somewhat (by about 1/3), add apple and toss gently with cabbage and onion. When liquid is 2/3 reduced, push solids to the sides of the pan to make a clearing in the center, and stir mustard in to the liquid in the middle. Toss liquid and solids together, taste, and correct seasonings if needed.

Thursday, February 11, 2010

Mill Valley to Open at 10:00am

Thursday, February 11th.
We will be opening at 10:am

Lot has been plowed in the upper level only, so be careful & be patient with each other.

Yes, we still have snow shovels.
No ice melt - no sleds.

Road conditions as of this morning
Falls Rd from 36th. St. to 41 st. St. - 1 lane in each direction down to bare pavement.
West 36th. St. from Falls Rd. to Chestnut Ave. passable, but only about 1 1/2 lanes in some spots.
Chestnut Ave. from 36th. St. to 33rd. St. about the same as 36th. St.
Keswick Rd. from 34th. St. to 29th. St. "passable" - snow packed.
2900 & 2800 blocks of Sisson St. in good shape.

Sunday, February 7, 2010

Mill Valley General Store Closed due to Weather

We will be closed on Sunday, February 7th. We are on schedule with our snow removal contractor, but needless to say, they are running behind schedule.
We will re-open on Thursday, Feb. 11th. at 9:00am.

Due to the disruption in everyone's life over the last few days,
we have extended the deadline for
Winter Buyer's Co-op
through Saturday, February13th.
The price will be prorated for the weeks you have missed.

Thursday, January 28, 2010

!!!CANCELLED!!! Food Demo & Sampling - Saturday, Feb.6th.


Food Demo & Sampling has been
!!!!Canceled!!!

Due to the impending inclement weather, we thought it best to postpone this event.

New date will be announced ASAP.

We will continue to accept Winter Buyer's Co-op Memberships through Sunday, 2/14/2010 - at a pro-rated discount.


Still have not decided to join our Winter Buyer's Co-op? Already a member & not sure what to do with winter root vegetables? Then join us on Saturday, February 6th. as the incomparable Hanne Blank shows you how to easily craft these scrumptious recipes at

Mill Valley's Food Demo & Sampling.
Free & open to the all.

Demo & Samplings will occur at
10:00am * 11:00am * Noon & 1:00pm
Drop in at your convenience

Moroccan Orange Salad
Bright and zesty, this version of a traditional North African salad is
great when more traditional salad ingredients are out of season.

Roasted Baby Beets and Turnips with Mint-Garlic Yogurt
Roasted root vegetables served with yogurt are a comfort food
throughout the Fertile Crescent.


Mushroom-Celeriac Pecan Pate
This versatile, light, and savory vegan pate works with bread,
crackers, or crudités, and makes a great sandwich filling. It is also
delicious thinned with some of the pasta cooking water and tossed with
hot pasta as a pesto. This recipe makes enough for several meals.


Braised Red Cabbage with Apple and Mustard
A twist on a traditional Mennonite method of cooking the old faithfuls
of winter produce. This holds well, so make enough for lunch the next day.

Friday, January 15, 2010

What to do with that leftover Ham

Ham & Egg Pie
a hearty brunch or dinner
2 cups cooked ham
6 tablespoons flour
1/4 cup chopped celery
2 - 3 cups milk***
1/4 cup chopped onion
1 - 1/4 teaspoons salt
3 tablespoons butter
2 hard boiled eggs, chopped
Pre- heat oven 400 degrees.
Brown celery & onion in butter. Blend in flour & cook for at least 1 minute. Gradually add milk, stirring to incorporate. Season & fold in cubed ham & chopped eggs. Place in casserole & cover with biscuits. Bake in pre-heated oven 30 minutes or until crust is thoroughly baked & golden brown.
*** Start with 2 cups of milk. Continue adding until sauce is thick, yet pourable.
Enjoy!